two separate parts which are to be installed with copper-colored sections facing each other; two separate forms of slightly different shapes, with exteriors covered in short grey fur-like wires, each with an indentation with copper colored wires; interior (flattest side) of each form covered with teardrop shaped metal pallets in copper and silver

Copper Passage, c. 2013

Mary Giles

Waxed linen, hammered copper, fine iron wire

Gift of Jim Harris 2019.5.22a,b

On View in Gallery 281

“Copper Passage” is a superb example of Mary Giles’s “boulders”—a type of closed, sculptural basket for which she became known. She started making boulder sculptures in 1999 after having work done on her Stillwater, Minnesota, home, which rested on a cluster of boulders. When workers excavated the large rocks, one broke in half. Giles was captivated by the split rock, and how the color of its “skin” contrasted with its core. Through a mass of iron and copper elements one catches glimpses of the coiled basket structure that lies beneath.

Image: In Copyright. Gift of Jim Harris

Unexpected Turns: Women Artists and the Making of American Basket Weaving Traditions

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