binding: mottled calf, gilt tooled with a green panel on spine lettered: CAPRICH DE GOYA; endpapers: contemporary Spanish marbled papers

Por que fue sensible, 1797-1798

Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes

Etching and aquatint

The William Hood Dunwoody Fund by exchange, and Gift of funds from Mr. and Mrs. John T. Adams, Dr. and Mrs. David Bradford, Mr. and Mrs. Benton J. Case, Mr. and Mrs. W. John Driscoll, Mr. and Mrs. Reuel Harmon P.83.57.32

Not on View

Francisco Goya’s series Los Caprichos contains layers of meaning that even today challenge the modern viewer. Mia’s copy is a rare presentation proof containing early printings of all eighty images. In the first half, Goya explored themes of superstition, sensuality, greed, and violence with scenes set in Spanish brothels, salons, and prisons. The second half is given over to fantastic images from the artist’s dreams and nightmares. Even though Goya tried to disguise his attacks on Spanish society, he withdrew the set from sale because he had been reported to the Inquisition, a tribunal that ruled with lethal authority.

Image: Public Domain. The William Hood Dunwoody Fund by exchange, and Gift of funds from Mr. and Mrs. John T. Adams, Dr. and Mrs. David Bradford, Mr. and Mrs. Benton J. Case, Mr. and Mrs. W. John Driscoll, Mr. and Mrs. Reuel Harmon

Prints of Darkness: The Art of Aquatint

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