standing blacksmith with short, dark hair and beard, with his shirt open, holding a white-hot metal bar with a pliers on top of an anvil; silhouette of another figure in front of fire at left; shadows at edges

A Blacksmith, 1833

Eugène Delacroix

Aquatint

Gift of funds from Barbara Longfellow 2013.69

Not on View

Eugène Delacroix, the leader of the French Romantic school of painters, was also active as a printmaker. Blacksmiths were a recurrent theme for Romantic artists. They showed man as a modern-day Vulcan, harnessing the elements of fire and earth for god-like creation. Focusing tightly on the heroic individual, Delacroix emphasized the blacksmith’s powerful physique. Light emanating from the white-hot iron illuminates the man’s shirt and sets his skin aglow.

This is a superb example of one of the most desirable prints by Delacroix. It is an important addition to Mia's collection because of its rarity, quality, and pristine condition.

Image: Public Domain. Gift of funds from Barbara Longfellow

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