ovoid shape, with two handle-like protrusions on long sides; rust-red and brown; rim and handles painted with running geometric designs

Wine Cup, 2nd century BCE

Unknown artist, expand_more
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By the middle of the Warring States period (475-221 b.c.), the finest eating utensils made for elegant dining were being made of lacquer. Thinly carved, wooden objects were protected with several coats of lacquer creating a light, durable vessel. Decorated, with geometric and curvilinear designs in black on orange lacquer, this rare cup has survived intact with its quatrefoil-shaped cup stand made of gilt bronze. Known in China as "ear cups", this type of vessel was typically used for drinking wine. This well-preserved example displays crescent-shaped handles, a style that began in the fourth century b.c. and remained popular throughout the Han dynasty (206 b.c.-220 a.d.). Several gilt bronze cup stands of similar form were discovered in a royal tomb in the vicinity of the mausoleum of the Han emperor Wu Ti (156-87 b.c.), in 1982 in Shensi province.

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Ancient Lacquer Ware (#067)
Details
Title
Wine Cup
Role
Artist
Accession Number
2005.52.2.1
Curator Approved

This record has been reviewed by our curatorial staff but may be incomplete. These records are frequently revised and enhanced. If you notice a mistake or have additional information about this object, please email collectionsdata@artsmia.org.

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ovoid shape, with two handle-like protrusions on long sides; rust-red and brown; rim and handles painted with running geometric designs