shallow sides divided into six petal-shaped lobes separated by narrow raised ribs; metal edge bordering the lip

Dish, 960-1279

Unknown artist, expand_more
G204expand_more

Among the most rare of all Chinese ceramics, Guan ware vessels are generally small, simple and unadorned, reflecting the subtle artistic taste of the Southern Song (1127-1279) court that sponsored them. Made in Hangzhou, these pieces are characterized by their simple potting and thick glaze applied in so many layers that the glaze is often thicker than the body itself. The overall crackle pattern is caused by differences in cooling rates between the body and glaze. At first, the cracks were likely accidental, but they came to be widely appreciated and the effect was deliberately induced. This dish, possibly used as a scholar's brush washer, is distinguished by its rare shape and jade-like pale blue glaze. The copper rim protector was likely added during the Ming period.

Details
Title
Dish
Role
Artist
Accession Number
98.175
Curator Approved

This record has been reviewed by our curatorial staff but may be incomplete. These records are frequently revised and enhanced. If you notice a mistake or have additional information about this object, please email collectionsdata@artsmia.org.

Does something look wrong with this image? Let us know

shallow sides divided into six petal-shaped lobes separated by narrow raised ribs; metal edge bordering the lip