blue and white batik pattern with flowers, swirls and geometric designs; embellished with gold cross-stitch embroidery; zipper on PL side allowing access to space between front and back panels; six ties

Woman's Bib, 20th century

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In Hmong tradition, women have created complex textiles, often with geometric, abstracted patterns, that provide a shared visual language within an oral culture. Among the most difficult to produce are indigo batiks, which depend on a resist-dyeing process. First, the design is drawn on the cloth with wax, which resists dyeing and protects the pattern. Then the cloth is dipped in an indigo dye bath. Next, the wax is removed, revealing the intricate design. Patterns signify communal values, with the spiral motifs seen here associated with family. Over centuries of displacement, the Hmong use textiles as a primary transmitter of culture.

Details
Title
Woman's Bib
Role
Artist
Accession Number
2004.169.51
Curator Approved

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blue and white batik pattern with flowers, swirls and geometric designs; embellished with gold cross-stitch embroidery; zipper on PL side allowing access to space between front and back panels; six ties