Ewer, with pheasant's head stopper. Pear-shaped body, with tapering short neck and short spout, on domed, spreading foot. The removable stopper, in the form of a pheasant's head, is modelled in full relief with carved details, the double strand handle is also modelled. Buff white porcelain with even, creamy-white glaze.

Ewer with Pheasant-Head Stopper, 8th century

Unknown artist, expand_more
G204expand_more

Tang white ware, the world's first porcelain--durable, finely potted, and simply adorned--set a technical and aesthetic standard for all subsequent dynasties. It would also influence Middle Eastern ceramic traditions. This exceptionally rare ewer is capped with a removable lid in the shape of a pheasant head. It differs from earlier yueh ware examples in that the spout is not set on the shoulder of the vessel but rather at the top of a simple, elegantly shaped container nearly devoid of decoration. It is possible that silver or even glass vessels imported from the Middle East during Tang (618-906) may have influenced the basic shape and placement of the bird head at the top of the vessel. The refined form and pure white color however is reflective of Chinese taste in early porcelain.

Details
Title
Ewer with Pheasant-Head Stopper
Role
Artist
Accession Number
50.1a,b
Curator Approved

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Ewer, with pheasant's head stopper. Pear-shaped body, with tapering short neck and short spout, on domed, spreading foot. The removable stopper, in the form of a pheasant's head, is modelled in full relief with carved details, the double strand handle is also modelled. Buff white porcelain with even, creamy-white glaze.