thinly cast with a narrow spout and pointed lip above an oblong body cast with three medial lines, a single loop handle; all standing on tall blade-form legs

Jue wine vessel, 16th-15th century BCE

Unknown artist, expand_more

Bronzeexpand_more

Gift of Ruth and Bruce Daytonexpand_more  98.80.2

G214expand_more

This wine vessel dates from nearly the beginning of the Chinese Bronze Age. Its plainness may reflect the relative newness of bronze casting technology; artisans were still figuring out the basics. This relic is from the Erligang culture (1600–1300 BCE), which flourished during the early Shang and predates the movement of the Shang capital to Anyang around 1300 BCE. Archaeological research shows that the jue is the earliest ritual wine vessel form and that it was developed about 1700–1600 BCE. Artisans originally based the jue on the style of existing pottery vessels. The form rapidly evolved toward an aesthetic based entirely on cast-bronze principles, and this vessel demonstrates the primitive technology and awkward proportions of the first ceremonial bronzes.

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Details
Title
Jue wine vessel
Role
Artist
Accession Number
98.80.2
Curator Approved

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thinly cast with a narrow spout and pointed lip above an oblong body cast with three medial lines, a single loop handle; all standing on tall blade-form legs