Rembrandt in a Fur Cap (the dress light), 1630

Not on Viewexpand_more

Early in his career, Rembrandt catered to the popular demand for history paintings-high-minded narratives of biblical or historical scenes. These works were judged on how realistically the artist conveyed dramatic emotion. With that in mind, Rembrandt spent hours in front of the mirror making faces at himself and recording what he saw. Thus, while revealing as self-portraits, these head studies show Rembrandt's lifelong interest in exploring human expressions and making them integral to his work. Because copper was so expensive, he would sketch several heads on one plate and cut it apart, which is why these prints are so tiny. In an unprecedented program of self-portraiture, Rembrandt depicted his likeness at least 40 times in paintings and 31 times in prints.

Details
Title
Rembrandt in a Fur Cap (the dress light)
Artist Life
1606–1669
Role
Artist
Accession Number
P.1,232
Provenance
Ambroise Firmin-Didot, (L.119).
Catalogue Raisonne
Hind 29 iv/v; B.24; M.28 iv/vi or v/v; B-B.30-L iv/iv; Holl. 24 iv/iv
Curator Approved

This record has been reviewed by our curatorial staff but may be incomplete. These records are frequently revised and enhanced. If you notice a mistake or have additional information about this object, please email collectionsdata@artsmia.org.

Does something look wrong with this image? Let us know

Zoom in on the left to the detail you'd like to save. Click 'Save detail' and wait until the image updates. Right click the image to 'save image as' or copy link, or click the image to open in a new tab.