narrower lower portion with slightly larger upper portion; paper with huang hua-li supports; geometric designs at top and bottom corners of upper section and on edges of lower section

Lantern, one of a pair, late 17th-early 18th century

Unknown artist, expand_more

Huang hua-li and silkexpand_more

Gift of Ruth and Bruce Daytonexpand_more  2001.157.1

G218expand_more

When made from precious hardwoods, hanging lanterns were typically imaginative and rather ornate during the late Ming and Ch'ing era (17th-18th century). Within aristocratic homes, lanterns were suspended from high beams to illuminate dim interiors and enliven the tall, dark ceilings with their delicate, lattice designs. This pair is made with folding frames making for easy storage. The frames are also designed with four "feet" that allowed them to be set on a table to function more as a lamp than a suspended lantern. While paper screens were used in less expensive lighting, these panels are silk. Glass became popular during the 19th century. Most lanterns burned oil or wax as their light source.

Details
Title
Lantern, one of a pair
Role
Artist
Accession Number
2001.157.1
Curator Approved

This record has been reviewed by our curatorial staff but may be incomplete. These records are frequently revised and enhanced. If you notice a mistake or have additional information about this object, please email collectionsdata@artsmia.org.

Does something look wrong with this image? Let us know

narrower lower portion with slightly larger upper portion; paper with huang hua-li supports; geometric designs at top and bottom corners of upper section and on edges of lower section