Allegory. Lucretia, portrait of a young woman, seconds after taking her own life, holding knife in right hand, blood-stained chemise, left hand grasps bell cord.

Lucretia, 1666

Oil on canvasexpand_more

The William Hood Dunwoody Fundexpand_more  34.19

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Rembrandt tells the story of Lucretia through her solemn and saddened gaze, in the traces of blood on her gown, and the dagger in her hand. The wife of a Roman nobleman, Lucretia was known for her loyalty and virtue. She was raped by Sextus Tarquinius, the son of the ruling tyrant. Lucretia revealed the crime to her husband and father, and, in their presence, took her own life. She chose death in order to prevent dishonor, at a time and place when a woman’s perceived virtue was more valuable than her life.

Details
Title
Lucretia
Artist Life
1606–1669
Role
Artist
Accession Number
34.19
Curator Approved

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Allegory. Lucretia, portrait of a young woman, seconds after taking her own life, holding knife in right hand, blood-stained chemise, left hand grasps bell cord.