Incense burner, tripod, geometrical design. Grey earthenware, impressed with markings which indicate that the wet clay has been wrapped in matting. Pieces of this Neolithic mat-marked pottery were found in Honan; made without wheel. The clay clinging to it makes it look tan in color.

Li tripod, 13th-12th century BCE

Unknown artist, expand_more

Hand-built from common clay, this straightforward utilitarian "cord marked" tripod, like its Neolithic predecessors, was designed to expose a large surface to the cooking fire. At this early point in time, bronze ceremonial vessels were being influenced by Neolithic ceramic shapes such as this one. The situation would soon reverse itself, however, and by the late Bronze Age a majority of ceremonial ceramics were made in imitation of more expensive bronze vessels.

Details
Title
Li tripod
Role
Artist
Accession Number
32.54.11
Curator Approved

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Incense burner, tripod, geometrical design. Grey earthenware, impressed with markings which indicate that the wet clay has been wrapped in matting. Pieces of this Neolithic mat-marked pottery were found in Honan; made without wheel. The clay clinging to it makes it look tan in color.