dark brown glaze splashed with pale blue on the vessel's shoulder; rare phosphatic glaze; unglazed foot

Jar, 8th century

Unknown artist, expand_more
G204expand_more

The most prominent high-fired Tang ceramics produced in northern China were black wares from the Huang tao kiln, Jia county, in Hunan province. Many pieces made there during the eighth and ninth centuries feature blue, grey, amber, or white phosphatic splashes against rich black grounds. With thick glazes that run, drip and pool together in seemingly random ways, these vessels have freer, more casual appearances than contemporary monochrome ceramics with their carefully controlled shapes and colors. Suffused with milky blue splashes, the dark brown glaze of this kuan jar stops short of the foot. The blue splashes were probably applied with a brush just before firing. With their earth tones and accidental glaze effects, Huang-t'ao wares greatly influenced Song dynasty tea ceramics, which, in turn, strongly affected subsequent Japanese pottery traditions.

Details
Title
Jar
Role
Artist
Accession Number
96.51
Curator Approved

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dark brown glaze splashed with pale blue on the vessel's shoulder; rare phosphatic glaze; unglazed foot