A Roman legionary fallen in battle embraced at the moment of death by the genius or spirit of victory.

Kiss of Victory, 1878–1881

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Alfred Gilbert's commemorative sculpture Kiss of Victory shows a Roman legionary fallen in battle and embraced at the moment of death by the genius or spirit of victory. It is possible that Gilbert began Kiss of Victory as a private memorial to his brother Gordon who had died only months before Gilbert started working on the sculpture. It was designed in Paris, where Gilbert studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. On the encouragement of his professor, Pierre-Jules Cavelier, Gilbert traveled to Rome, where he executed the sculpture in marble. [P][I]Kiss of Victory[/I] was commissioned by Somerset Beaumont (1835-1921), one of Gilbert's most loyal patrons and friends throughout his career. As a private commission, the sculpture was intended to be seen close up in an intimate space such as a drawing room or entrance hall.

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Gilbert, Kiss of Victory (#420)
Details
Title
Kiss of Victory
Artist Life
1854–1934
Role
Sculptor
Dimension
89 1/2 in. (227.33 cm)
Accession Number
76.32
Curator Approved

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A Roman legionary fallen in battle embraced at the moment of death by the genius or spirit of victory.