printed by Cole Weston

Center for Creative Photography %C2%A91981 Arizona Board of Regents

Shell, 1931

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Initially creating soft-focused pictorial images, Edward Weston began to experiment in a more modernist manner around 1922. First in New Mexico and later in California, using objects that ranged from desert landscapes and portraits, to ordinary household objects, he changed the way that photography is viewed in modern art by promoting the medium as something to be experimented with, rather than just attempting to create a pictorial, or painterly image. His crisp, clean black and white photos were able to capture vast landscapes that would dissolve into flattened patterns, his nudes became soft shapes against darkened backgrounds, and his still lifes of vegetables began to take on the qualities of human portraits. By changing the way we view the everyday, Weston encouraged the viewer to look at the mundane under an abstracted lens, turning the everyday into something more noteworthy.

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Edward Weston (#485)
Details
Title
Shell
Artist Life
1886 - 1958
Role
Photographer
Accession Number
71.21.18
Curator Approved

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printed by Cole Weston

Center for Creative Photography ©1981 Arizona Board of Regents

Because of © restrictions, we can only show you a small image of this artwork.