Dutch golden age. Three quarter length figure of a young woman in black, seated toward the left, but looking at the viewer. A thin film of lace is around her heard, and she wears a deep white collar and broad white cuffs. In one hand is a black fan, and by the other lie her black gloves. Dark background.

Portrait of a Young Girl, c. 1650

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Gift of Bruce B. Daytonexpand_more  72.78

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Portrait paintings were a common household item in the 1600s, a period known as the Dutch Golden Age. These portraits would stay within the family, passed down for generations, documenting the life and clothing of ancestors. In this painting, the young woman is dressed in a plain black gown, laced bodice, headpiece, and a collar typical of the 1650s. Her identity is unknown, though she was clearly a lady of a comfortable class in Amsterdam, the capital of the Netherlands. Each Dutch city during the Golden Age had at least one counterfeiter (portrait painter) to support the era’s high demand for portraitures.

Details
Title
Portrait of a Young Girl
Artist Life
1614–1670
Role
Artist
Accession Number
72.78
Curator Approved

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Dutch golden age. Three quarter length figure of a young woman in black, seated toward the left, but looking at the viewer. A thin film of lace is around her heard, and she wears a deep white collar and broad white cuffs. In one hand is a black fan, and by the other lie her black gloves. Dark background.