profile view of seated woman wearing wide-rimmed black hat and black skirt wtih multi-colored sketchy background

Seated Woman in the Studio, 1909

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Ernst Ludwig Kirchner was a founder and the de facto leader of Die Brücke (The Bridge), one of Germany’s first and ultimately most influential associations of progressive artists. The members hungered for new artistic inspiration, which they found in works by foreigners, especially Vincent van Gogh, Edvard Munch, and Henri Matisse. When drawing Seated Woman in the Studio, Kirchner was fresh from seeing the products of Matisse’s Fauve (wild animal) period. He seems to have been feverishly eager to emulate the Frenchman’s brushstrokes of daring color, contorted and flattened figures, and patterned decorative settings. Though conservative critics found the result “half barbaric, half refined,” a more sympathetic commentator singled out Kirchner as making the greatest contribution to the expression of Brücke principles, “the wish for a picture based on nature, but only as material for a (more or less consciously) simplified and constructed synthesis.”

Details
Title
Seated Woman in the Studio
Artist Life
1880–1938
Role
Artist
Accession Number
67.41
Provenance
[Alan Auslander Gallery, New York, until 1966]; [Allan Frumkin Gallery, New York, 1966-67; sold to MIA].
Curator Approved

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profile view of seated woman wearing wide-rimmed black hat and black skirt wtih multi-colored sketchy background