large, rust-colored jar with dripping brown and tan over glaze; narrow base widening to top with graceful, short neck and rolling lip

Storage jar, 16th century

expand_more
Not on Viewexpand_more

This large Shigaraki jar is noted for the brown ash glaze that pools and drips unevenly across its rough surface, which is marked by particles of white feldspar. Potters in Shigaraki began making bowls, jars, mortars, and other vessels for utilitarian use around a millennium ago. The irregular properties of the local clay and unique firing processes lent Shigaraki pots and bowls a sense of rusticity and spontaneity. Late in the fifteenth century, the ostensible artlessness of Shigaraki pottery drew the attention of tea masters like Murata Jukou (1423-1502) who embraced a new style of tea ceremony based on the unpretentious, austere aesthetic concept known as “wabi.”

Exhibitions
Details
Title
Storage jar
Role
Artist
Accession Number
2015.79.325
Catalogue Raisonne
Murase, Art through a Lifetime, no. 662
Curator Approved

This record is from historic documentation and may not have been reviewed by a curator, so may be inaccurate or incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. If you notice a mistake or have additional information about this object, please email collectionsdata@artsmia.org.

Does something look wrong with this image? Let us know

Zoom in on the left to the detail you'd like to save. Click 'Save detail' and wait until the image updates. Right click the image to 'save image as' or copy link, or click the image to open in a new tab.

large, rust-colored jar with dripping brown and tan over glaze; narrow base widening to top with graceful, short neck and rolling lip