one of a pair of landscapes, right; once grouped with a white-robed Kannon that was placed in the center; tall, vertical rock formation at L; water at R with a boat and more rock formations and a flock of birds in the background; in foreground, smaller rock formation with pine trees, small village, and two men walking away from fishing boat

Landscape [right of a triptych of White-Robed Kannon with Landscapes], late 15th century

Buddhist monks, particularly those of the Zen school, were devoted landscape painters. Like calligraphy, painting was considered part of the spiritual training necessary for enlightenment. Zen monks favored monochrome ink painting due to its simplicity and straightforwardness. The priest Kenkō Shōkei, who served as secretary at Kenchōji Temple in Kamakura, studied Chinese paintings from the Song (960-1279) and Yuan (1279-1368) dynasties and became a key figure in the ink-painting circles of Japan

Details
Title
Landscape [right of a triptych of White-Robed Kannon with Landscapes]
Artist Life
active before 1478–ca. 1523
Role
Artist
Accession Number
2013.29.143.3
Curator Approved

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one of a pair of landscapes, right; once grouped with a white-robed Kannon that was placed in the center; tall, vertical rock formation at L; water at R with a boat and more rock formations and a flock of birds in the background; in foreground, smaller rock formation with pine trees, small village, and two men walking away from fishing boat