The purpose served by this implement is unknown, but it is possible that it was used for stirring wine. A highly complicated combination of animal motifs occurs in openwork on the handle. This handle, in its entirety, forms a beaked head with the rod serving as the body. As it approaches the handle, the rod displays a leg with a tuft and claw which rises to touch the beak of the bird. The handle itself divides into one bird whose crest supports the belly of a dragon. The dragon turns its head to the left, showing the teeth in its open mouth. For clarification of this involved composition, see Katrlgren Number 76, figures 70,71, 72. This composition occurs frequently in dagger axes, e.g., Karlgren plate 99 (50.46.15 and 50.46.67). Patina green

Implement, 11th-10th century BCE

Unknown artist, expand_more

Bronzeexpand_more

Bequest of Alfred F. Pillsburyexpand_more  50.46.75

G214expand_more
Details
Title
Implement
Role
Artist
Accession Number
50.46.75
Curator Approved

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The purpose served by this implement is unknown, but it is possible that it was used for stirring wine. A highly complicated combination of animal motifs occurs in openwork on the handle. This handle, in its entirety, forms a beaked head with the rod serving as the body. As it approaches the handle, the rod displays a leg with a tuft and claw which rises to touch the beak of the bird. The handle itself divides into one bird whose crest supports the belly of a dragon. The dragon turns its head to the left, showing the teeth in its open mouth. For clarification of this involved composition, see Katrlgren Number 76, figures 70,71, 72. This composition occurs frequently in dagger axes, e.g., Karlgren plate 99 (50.46.15 and 50.46.67). Patina green