FJS #122; bulbous body with narrow neck; orange/ brown and black designs on white slip; triangular pattern inside upper rim

Olla, c. 1900-10

Ceramic, pigmentexpand_more

Bequest of Frank J. Soraufexpand_more  2014.97.7

Pottery making at Po-woh-ge-oweenge (San Ildefonso Pueblo) was impacted in different ways than at Haaku (Acoma). When the Santa Fe Trail was opened in 1821, enamelware and metal containers became available, causing the production of pottery to decline. Even so, there still remained a few potters who were producing various types of pottery. Two of these potters were a husband and wife team named Martina and Florentino Montoya. Their signature innovation was the extension of the white slip over the entire surface, including the underbody and concave base. The Montoya's had close ties to the Kotyit (Cochiti Pueblo) and are credited with introducing the "Cochiti slip" to Po-woh-ge-oweenge. This slip can be quickly polished with a rag and was preferred over the native slip, which required tedious stone polishing.

Details
Title
Olla
Artist Life
1856 - 1916
Role
Artist
Accession Number
2014.97.7
Curator Approved

This record has been reviewed by our curatorial staff but may be incomplete. These records are frequently revised and enhanced. If you notice a mistake or have additional information about this object, please email collectionsdata@artsmia.org.

Does something look wrong with this image? Let us know

Zoom in on the left to the detail you'd like to save. Click 'Save detail' and wait until the image updates. Right click the image to 'save image as' or copy link, or click the image to open in a new tab.

FJS #122; bulbous body with narrow neck; orange/ brown and black designs on white slip; triangular pattern inside upper rim