red stone; carved in the shape of a man's face, wearing a cap, with long squared-off beard and moustache

Portrait Pipe Bowl, Date Unknown

Not on Viewexpand_more

Based on historical data and oral tradition, pipes made from pipestone were created for a variety of purposes. These include ceremonial use, recreational smoking, for sale, trade, and gifts. Pipe bowls made of materials other than pipestone were not for ceremonial purposes. This bowl and stem set was created as a gift to Dr. Jared Waldo Daniels, a U.S. Army surgeon. Daniels worked at Fort Snelling and protested against the treatment and oppression of the Dakota by the United States government. Many Native people were his patients, whom he treated free of charge.

An unknown Dakota artist created this portrait pipe resembling Dr. Daniels, and probably presented it to him as a gift for his medical services. The skill of the artist is evident when the sculpture is compared with a photograph of Dr. Daniels taken at the same time period. The Dakota artist cleverly made the stem of the pipe resemble a leg wearing an Army boot.
Details
Title
Portrait Pipe Bowl
Role
Artist
Accession Number
2008.99.49.1
Curator Approved

This record has been reviewed by our curatorial staff but may be incomplete. These records are frequently revised and enhanced. If you notice a mistake or have additional information about this object, please email collectionsdata@artsmia.org.

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red stone; carved in the shape of a man's face, wearing a cap, with long squared-off beard and moustache