stone figure with red pigment stands on black wood base with hands touching index figure to thumb; face incised on either side with rectangular markings; headdress crowns figure with large ear ornaments; small drill hole in center of chest

Chalchiuhtlicue, c. 1200-1521

expand_more
G260expand_more

Chalchiuhtlicue (Chal-chee-oot-LEE-kway), literally "She of the Jade Skirt," is the Mexica (meh-SHEE-kah) goddess of water and the wife of rain god Tlaloc (TLAH-loak). She is identifiable by her distinctive wide headband with large tassels. Precious stone or shell was once inlaid into her eyes, the incisions in her cheeks, and the cavity in her chest. However, this sculpture assumes the pose characteristic of another important Mexica goddess. Her pose, standing with her hands extending outward as if she were holding something, is typical of the corn goddess Chicomecoatl (Chee-koh-may-KOH-atl). As Chicomecoatl, she would have likely held small ears of an ancient variety of corn, which are now lost. Both goddesses are associated with fertility. A sculpture like this one would have been the focal point of a shrine.

Explore
Details
Title
Chalchiuhtlicue
Role
Artist
Accession Number
2009.33
Curator Approved

This record is from historic documentation and may not have been reviewed by a curator, so may be inaccurate or incomplete. Our records are frequently revised and enhanced. If you notice a mistake or have additional information about this object, please email collectionsdata@artsmia.org.

Does something look wrong with this image? Let us know

stone figure with red pigment stands on black wood base with hands touching index figure to thumb; face incised on either side with rectangular markings; headdress crowns figure with large ear ornaments; small drill hole in center of chest